Romance in WWII England – A review of “I’ll Be Seeing You” by Margaret Mayhew

As devastating to human life as war is, the toll exacted on personal relationships is oftentimes equally destructive and the reverberations can echo through multiple generations. In “I’ll Be Seeing You”, Juliet Porter’s mother lost her battle with cancer and knowing her death was imminent, she left a letter revealing her WWII romance with an American bomber pilot who was Juliet’s biological father and that she’d never stopped loving him. But the letter was woefully lacking in details. The only clue was a snapshot of an American bomber crew. No names, no nothing.

Once Juliet got over her initial shock, anger quickly followed and then her resolve to find his identity. The hunt for information soon turned into a quest. Some might say an obsession. Juliet doggedly pursued every lead even though she had no plans to reveal herself to him. She HAD to find out who he was.

“I’ll Be Seeing You” is not an historic treatise by any stretch of the imagination. In my opinion, Margaret Mayhew intended it to be just what it is, a romance set in WWII England. To that end, the story more than meets its goal.

The protagonist is stereotypically British in her reticence, which is a little off-putting to the reader. However, Mayhew gives us a good understanding of her thought processes and her emotions in what would be a major upheaval in anyone’s life. So why would we expect her to react differently? I found it to be an enjoyable and very satisfying romantic read.

That said, Juliet’s present day romance with Rob seems incomplete, almost as an afterthought. I can’t quite make up my mind about the value of expanding that but it kinda’ left me wanting more. Four and a half stars.

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WWII Romance

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